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Then thank thyself, wild fool, that would'st not be Content to know, — ^whatwas too much for thee! Read Homer once, and you can read no more ; For all books else appear so mean, so poor, Verse will seem prose; but still persist to read. — Tem- ple, Sir William, 1689-99, Ancient and Modem Ijcaming. — Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley Cooper Earl, 1711, Characteristics. Hath thy toil O'er books consumed ti^e midnight oil? Fergusson, Robert, 1750—1774 Fielding, Henry, 1707—1754 Journey from this World Tom Jonea, .

We whom the world is pleased to hon- our with the title of modern authors should never have been able to compass our great design of everlasting remem- brance and never-dying fame if our en- deavours had not been so highly service- able to the general good of mankind. —Gay, John, 1727-38, The Shepherd and the Philosopher, Fables. 1657—1734 DODD, Wi LUAM, 1729—1777 Doddridge, Phiup, 1702—1751 Do DDJGTON, George Bubb 1691-1762 DODSLET, Robert 1703—1764 —Dyer, John, 17007—1758 ECHARD, Laurence, 1670? Mf events to the uses to which wise men ' always apply them, viz., to the instruction of others by this example, and to justify and honour the wisdom of Providence in all the variety of our circumstances, let them happen how they will.

Libraries are as the shrines where all the relics of the ancient saints, full of true virtue, and that without delusion or imposture, are preserved and reposed.

(Query) Whether the collected wisdom of all ages and nations be not found in books ? Nor is there any paternal fondness which seems to savour less of absolute instinct, and which may be so well recon- ciled to worldly wisdom, as this of authors for their books. — 1730 Edwards, Jonathan, 1703—1757 Per Boual, ...... The Editor believes the thing to be a just history of fact ; neither is there any appearance of fiction in it ; and, however, thinks, because all such things are despatched, that the improvement of it, as well to the diver- sion as to the instruction of the reader, will be the same.

These children may most truly be called the riqhes of their father, and many of them have with true filial piety fed their parent in his old age; so that not only the affection but the interest of the author may be highly injured by those slanderers whose poison- ous breath brings his book to an untimely end.— Fielding, Henry, 1749, The His- tory (f Tom Jones. —Byron, Lord, 1809, English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. It seems as though all the souls of all the writers that have bequeathed their labours to the Bodleians were reposing here as in some dormitory or middle state. I seem to inhale learning, walking amid their foliage ; and the odour of their old moth- scented coverings is fragrant as the first bloom of the sciential apples which grew amid the happy orchard.— Lamb, Charles, 1820, Dotard in the Lang Vacation. but my predominant feeling was one of pain and disturbance of mind, — not much unlike that which drew tears from Xerxes on viewing his immense army, and reflecting that in one hundred years not one soul would remain alive. And as such, he thinks, without farther compliment to the world, he does them a great service in the publi- cation.— Defoe, Daniel, 1719, Robinson Crusoe, Preface.

— Bacon, Francis Lord, 1605, The Ad- vancement (f Learning. Do not our hearts hug them, and quiet themselves in them even more than in God ?

I never come into a library (saith Hein- sius) but I bolt the door to me, excluding lust, ambition, avarice, and all such vices whose nurse is idleness, the mother of ignorance and melancholy herself ; and in the very lap of eternity, among so many divine souls, I take my seat with so lofty a spirit and sweet content that I pity all our great ones and rich men that know not their happiness.— Burton, Robert, 1621, Anatomy cf Melancholy. — Baxter, Rich- ard, 1650, The Saints Everlasting Rest.

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